She's got the books that kill.

The Magician's Land by Lev Grossman

Oh my goodness! I'm so tired, people! This was the second week of my new job schedule, so I was trying to get used to that, and then my husband gets sick. Oy!

So anyway, I'm finally getting around to this review of The Magician's Land by Lev Grossman.

This is the third book in the Magicians series. The series is about Quentin Coldwater who manages to get into a prestigious college of magic in upstate New York. He is obsessed with the Fillory books (think Narnia) and is convinced that it is a real place. He turns out to be right.

In this book, Quentin has been thrown out of Fillory and deposed as High King. He goes back to Brakebills school as a professor, but gets fired so he's at loose ends when he gets an invitation to a clandestine meeting of magicians. Lots of stuff happens and it wraps up the threads of the series quite nicely.

My favorite part of this book is the language: the witty banter between the characters and the random passages thrown about haphazardly. The snarky conversations these characters engage in makes even the most boring exposition entertaining.

Here is an example of a random paragraph of nonsense that has nothing to do with the plot and never comes up again, but is so diverting you don't even mind the tangent: "The library was still giving trouble: a few books in some of the more obscure corners of the stacks retained some autonomy, dating back to an infamous early experiment with flying books, and lately they'd begun to breed. Shocked undergraduates had stumbled on books in the very act. Which sounded interesting, but so far the resulting offspring had been either predictably derivative (in fiction) or stunningly boring (non-fiction); hybrid pairings between fiction and non-fiction were the most vital."

It took me forever to get through it, but while I was reading it I was happy. It made me feel good to read it. And really, what else can you want from a book?

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