She's got the books that kill.

Goodreads Update September 2019

This might be another big list. We'll see if I need to break it up again like last month. Let's go!

Stretched Too Thin

Stretched Too Thin: How Working Moms Can Lose the Guilt, Work Smarter, and Thrive by Jessica N. Turner - I found a list of books on modernmrsdarcy.com of self-help books that were her favorites. I pretty much put all of them on this list. This one is about working moms who try to do all the traditional mom things like cleaning, laundry, cooking, etc. while also working full time.

The Next Right Thing

The Next Right Thing: A Simple, Soulful Practice for Making Life Decisions by Emily P. Freeman - This is pretty much summed up in the subtitle. Whether you have always had trouble making decisions, or this is a new circumstance; whether you have some major life decisions to make, or just need peace in the every day; this books promises to teach you how to break it down to small steps.

Cozy Minimalist Home

Cozy Minimalist Home: More Style, Less Stuff by Myquillyn Smith - I am pulled by the idea of a minimalist home. It would be less stressful and more comforting. Unfortunately, I do not live alone in my home, so I don't get to make that decision. Also, I have zero style. But I can dream.

Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones

Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones by James Clear - There are several things about this title that give me pause. 1) the words "easy and proven". This is usually a telltale sign of bs. 2) the use of the & symbol instead of the word and. Just no. On the other hand, I could stand to build some new habits. I'll get it from the library.

Burnout

Burnout: The Secret to Unlocking the Stress Cycle by Emily Nagoski and Amelia Nagoski - People either love or hate this book. Tons of 5 star ratings on Goodreads and tons of 1 star ratings. It must have more 5s than 1s though, because it averages to 4 stars overall. I definitely have stress. I would like to not burnout. Could be helpful.

Hyperfocus

Hyperfocus: How to Be More Productive In a World of Distraction by Chris Bailey - This title reminds me of another book that provides help for those living in a "world of distraction". I don't know that I need to be much more productive. I get all my work done on time or earlier. But there's always room for improvement?

Brave Not Perfect

Brave, Not Perfect: Fear Less, Fail More, and Live Bolder by Reshma Saujani - The main point of this book is that girls are taught to be quiet and polite and be perfect. When we grow up, we become women who are afraid to challenge the status quo and go after what we want, because we might fail. I feel like I challenge the status quo all the time, but I am in a career dominated by women. I tend to take on more than I can handle, not because I'm afraid to say no, but because I want to do all the things. Still, I will check this out and see if it says anything to me. This is the last of the books from the Modern Mrs. Darcy list.

Dutch House

The Dutch House by Ann Patchett - This book is about a house outside Philadelphia. It is a large estate purchased by a newly wealthy man after WWII. The story is told by his son and it is not a happy story, I guess. Something about a mean stepmother. The boy and his sister are closely bonded and over the 50 years of this book they stick together through thick and thin.

Memory Police

The Memory Police by Yoko Ogawa - This is a kind of dystopian novel in which things keep disappearing. Little things, at first, but then more and more important things. The problem is, only some people remember that they ever existed because the momory police want them to disappear forever.

Lady Clementine

Lady Clementine by Marie Benedict - Benedict wrote one of my favorite books: The Swans of Fifth Avenue. This one is about Winston Churchill's wife. I didn't even know he had a wife. I knew about his mother being one of the American women with money who married English nobility. I forget what that phenomenon was called. This promises to be fantastic.

An American Sunrise

An American Sunrise: Poems by Joy Harjo - Harjo is the new Poet Laureate of the United States and is also an Oklahoman. She's been a big deal in these parts for awhile. The Harjos are a well-known family in certain circles. Most justice circles, unfortunately. Luckily Joy avoided those pitfalls. I don't know what came over me, since I don't typically care for poetry, but I decided to read this.

All Eyes on Us

All Eyes on Us by Kit Frick - Some of the girls in my reading group really enjoyed this, so I added it to my list. It's a YA mystery. Two girls are dating the same guy. Only one of them is using the relationship to mask her real relationship with her girlfriend. A private number is using the two of them to take down the boyfriend. But it's a dangerous game.

Little History of Literature

A Little History of Literature by John Sutherland - I love John Sutherland. He's knowledgeable and funny. Why haven't I read this before?

Bookworm

Bookworm: A Memoir of Childhood Rading by Lucy Mangan - You know I love a good book about books and reading. In this one, Mangan revisits her childhood and discusses the authors and the way reading shapes us.

Inside the Dream Palace

Inside the Dream Palace: The Life and Time of New York's Legendary Chelsea Hotel by Sherrill Tippins - I have an unexplainable fascination with New York's historical hotels. Like the Dakota. The Chelsea has been a haven for artistic types for over a century. Patti Smith wrote about it in her memoirs. Dylan Thomas died of pneumonia there and Nancy Spurgen was allegedly stabbed by her boyfriend, Sid Vicious, there. So interesting!

The Road to Jonestown

The Road to Jonestown: Jim Jones and Peoples Temple by Jeff Guinn - This guy was weird. And sick. And not in the good way. Guinn researched his whole twisted life. I can't wait to read about it.

I'm going to pause this right here. This is the halfway point, and I don't want to bog this post down with too many books. I'll do a second post for the other half that you can read another time when your brain is recharged.

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